Monday, March 26, 2018

The first Chrome OS tablet comes from Acer

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2018/03/26/acer-chromebook-tab-10/

There have been many Chrome OS devices with touchscreens, but there haven't been pure tablets. You've always had an attached keyboard as a fallback -- until today, that is. Acer has unveiled the first Chrome OS tablet, the Chromebook Tab 10, and there's nary a keyboard to be found. The 9.7-inch slate is aimed at squarely at education, where the all-touch input and light weight (1.21 pounds) could make it a better fit for younger students. Appropriately, there's a bundled battery-free Wacom stylus that lets kids draw and take notes.

The rest of the specs won't blow you away. There's a Chrome OS-oriented six-core, Rockchip-made OP1 processor, 4GB of RAM, 32GB of expandable storage, a 2-megapixel front camera and a 5-megapixel rear shooter. The most cutting-edge feature is a USB-C port that can charge other devices in addition to the tablet itself. Instead, the real allure is Chrome OS itself: it gives schools a secure, Google-centric tablet that runs Android apps and can be easily managed.

Acer will ship the Chromebook Tab 10 to North America in April for $329, and to Europe, the Middle East and Africa in May for €329. Don't expect to buy one yourself, though. Acer is only making the tablet available to commercial and education customers For now, at least, this is more about competing for classroom share that would normally go to basic Android tablets or iPads.

Source: Acer

Read More...

Friday, January 19, 2018

Intel's new cameras add human-like 3D vision to any machine

Source: https://www.engadget.com/2018/01/18/intel-realsense-ready-to-use-depth-cameras/

Intel has released two ready-to-use RealSense depth cameras, the D415 and the D435, that can add 3D capabilities to any device or machine. They both come in a USB-powered form factor and are capable of processing depth in real time, thanks to the chipmaker's new RealSense vision processor D4. The models work indoors and outdoors in any lighting environment, so they can be used for almost any machine that needs a depth camera. Those include drones meant to soar the skies and robots with AR/VR features.

Intel says the cameras' target audiences aren't just developers and manufacturers, but also makers and educators, since they're easy to use and will work as soon as you plug them in. Also, it comes with Intel's RealSense SDK 2.0, which is now a cross-platform, open source SDK.

Intel RealSense VP Sagi Ben Moshe said in a statement:

"Many of today's machines and devices use 2D image recognition-based computer vision, but with Intel RealSense's best-in-class depth technology, we are redefining future technologies to 'see' like a human, so devices and machines can truly enrich people's lives. With its compact, ready-to-use form, the Intel RealSense D400 Depth Camera series not only makes it easy for developers to build 3D depth sensing into any design, but they are also ready to be embedded into high-volume products."

The D415 and the D435 are now available for pre-order for $149 and $145, respectively. D415 has a narrow field of view and a rolling shutter that scans its environment from one side to the other to take an image. It works best when dealing with small objects and anything that needs precise measurements. D435, on the other hand, has a wider field of view and has a global shutter that takes images all at once. That makes it ideal for capturing depth perception of objects in motion and for covering big areas, since it minimizes blind spots.

Source: Intel

Read More...