Saturday, December 06, 2014

Gifify Creates Animated GIFs from the Command Line

Source: http://lifehacker.com/gifify-creates-animated-gifs-from-the-command-line-1667300811

Gifify Creates Animated GIFs from the Command Line

We've covered a ton of different ways to make animated GIFs before, but if you're looking for something even simpler, Gifify converts any video into a GIF from the command line.

Whether you simply don't want to deal with software like Photoshop or GIMP, or you just like the simplicity of the command line, Gifify does pretty much everything you need. You can make GIFs from sections of videos, adjust the output size, add subtitles, adjust the color output, change the speed, and more. Obviously you'll need to be familiar with the command line, but once you get the hang of it, Gifify is an incredibly fast and easy way to make GIFs.

Gifify | GitHub via One Thing Well

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Friday, December 05, 2014

Firefox beta simplifies video chat feature, can share calls with a single link

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/05/firefox-beta-simplifies-video-chat-feature-can-share-calls-with/

Firefox added its 'Hello' videochat feature to its experimental beta browser back in October, and now it's taking on board user feedback to make it all a little more appealing. You can still use the feature without registering for the account, but there's now less steps to get that running - you'll also get an audio ping when your partner joins the call. Conversation windows each have a unique URL, which can be shared, well, anywhere you can paste it. You can then maintain these links to continue conversations at a later time and the message history will remain, even if you aren't registered for an account. So, what is the point of logging in with a Firefox account? It'll let you directly call you contacts - if they're also logged in.. and aren't using Hangouts instead.

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Source: Firefox

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Thursday, December 04, 2014

The Creator CI20 Is Like a Hassle-Free Raspberry Pi

Source: http://lifehacker.com/the-creator-ci20-is-like-a-hassle-free-raspberry-pi-1666739950

The Creator CI20 Is Like a Hassle-Free Raspberry Pi

We love the Raspberry Pi, and at just $35 it's hard to argue with the price point. However, for some people, the Pi's lack of basic features like Wi-Fi make it a bit intimidating. The Creator CI20 hopes to appeal to those who want a bit more from the Pi.

The CI20 sports built-in Wi-Fi, a preloaded operating system (it can run Android 4.4, Debian 7, Gentoo, and Yoctoo), a graphics core capable of 1080p at 60 fps, 1GB RAM, 4GB on-board storage, and two USB ports. The processor's based on the MIPS32 processor used in smart TVs and low-cost mobile devices. If you're interested, you can preorder one right now for $65 and they should be shipping by the end of January.

Creator CI20 ($65) | via PC World

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Find the Files Taking Up the Most Space in Google Drive with this Link

Source: http://lifehacker.com/find-the-files-taking-up-the-most-space-in-google-drive-1666863242

Find the Files Taking Up the Most Space in Google Drive with this Link

At a glance, Google Drive doesn't allow you to sort files by size, which makes clearing out space kind of a pain. Thankfully, Digital Inspiration points to a hidden little spot where you can find that info.

If you hover your mouse over the "space used" text in the bottom left corner in Drive, then select Drive, you'll get a list of your files sorted by file size. Better yet, you can just head to drive.google.com/#quota to get to that sorting method immedietly. If you need to free up space, this makes things a lot easier.

How to Easily Find the Biggest Files in your Google Drive | Digital Inspiration

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The Navy's Smart New Stealth Anti-Ship Missile Can Plan Its Own Attack

Source: http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/the-navys-smart-new-stealth-anti-ship-missile-can-plan-1666079462/+kcampbelldollaghan

The Navy's Smart New Stealth Anti-Ship Missile Can Plan Its Own Attack

America's primary anti-ship missile, the Harpoon, has been in service now for close to 40 years and the Navy has been very reluctant to evolve when it comes to its anti-ship capabilities. Times are changing, with China's Navy on the rise and Russia flexing its muscle, the Cold War staple just won't do. Enter Lockheed's ninja-like Long Range Anti-Ship Missile to save the day.

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The FXX K hybrid supercar is LaFerrari's more powerful sibling

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/04/ferrari-fxx-k-laferrari-hybrid/

LaFerrari was already a beast, but the folks in Maranello wanted to make an even more aggressive hybrid -- thus, the FXX K was born. This supercar boasts an 848HP V12 engine (its predecessor has a 789HP one) and an electric motor that can generate 187HP (up from the LaFerrari's 160HP). The newer supercar inherited its older sibling's kinetic energy recovery system (KERS) that stores energy harnessed from braking. But it was redesigned from the original FXX to be more aerodynamic, with a higher tail section and new components to lessen drag. Bad news is, even if you're willing to empty your bank account, you can't exactly get one.

See, the hypercar was named as such, because it's part of Ferrari's XX Program, which allows the uber rich to drive the brand's experimental vehicles in exchange for major bucks. They can only do so on company-approved tracks, though, and they can't take the sweet, sweet hypercars home. Ferrari can get direct input from some of its top customers that way and use those suggestions to improve its other models. As for the K in its name, well, that came from its KERS capability, as you might have guessed. If you're in Abu Dhabi this coming weekend, you can at least see this "FXX on steroids" in person at the company's Finali Mondiali event, where it will be officially launched.

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Via: Autoblog

Source: Ferrari

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Hacked hearing aids produce stellar ambient tunes from WiFi signals

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/03/ambient-noise-hearing-aid-wifi-signals/

What if we could hear the numerous invisible data frequencies that swirl around us every day? That's exactly what a project from hearing-impaired writer Frank Swain and artist Daniel Jones aims to do. Phantom Terrains is the proper name of the effort, and by hacking Swain's Bluetooth-enabled hearing aids, the duo has transformed WiFi signals into ambient sounds. So instead of seeing the device as a prosthetic, it's used as a sort of super power. The modification allows him to stroll around and listen to the range of tones electromagnetic signals provide -- like the pattern of a network's security parameters. And of course, no one else nearby can pick them up.

"The project challenges the notion of assistive hearing technology as a prosthetic, re-imagining it as an enhancement that can surpass the ability of normal human hearing," the pair's website explains. "By using an audio interface to communicate data feeds rather than a visual one, Phantom Terrains explores hearing as a platform for augmented reality that can immerse us in continuous, dynamic streams of data." With plenty of invisible signals floating around, there's no end to the amount of data that's ripe for this sort of transformation. And thanks to designer Stefanie Posavec, detailed maps of signal data along the way make for quite the interesting visual compliment.

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Via: Wired

Source: Phantom Terrains

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Scientist's new rewriteable 'paper' is actually made of glass or plastic

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/04/rewritable-paper-yes-really/

If you ask us, the idea of rewritable paper seems pretty redundant no matter how high-tech it is. Apparently that didn't cross the mind of scientists at the University of California, Riverside. See, that's where Yadong Yin and his colleagues are using special color-switching dyes (called "redox") and an ultra-violet light to put text on a physical medium. In this case, that's a glass or plastic film like the tile above. The school says that these can be rewritten some 20 times without a significant loss in contrast or resolution, and could presumably replace the dead trees we're used to printing documents on. At this point, you're probably wondering how you erase the old text off, and that's fair -- even your favorite rubber pencil-cap won't do a thing here.

Apparently, all wiping the surface clean takes is throwing some heat at it. Yin and crew are working to bring the efficiency up to 100 rewrites, extend the text's lifespan beyond its current three-day mortality as well as developing a paper version. And no, this wasn't funded by Sony: the United States Department of Energy picked up the tab.

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Via: UPI

Source: University of California, Nature Communications

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Light-bending silicon strips are the key to super-fast computers

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/04/stanford-light-bending-silicon/

Stanford University's light-bending silicon strips

No, that's not a barcode you're looking at -- instead, it's the likely future of computing. Stanford University researchers have developed an optical link that uses silicon strips to bend light at right angles, which future processors will likely need to transmit data at super-fast speeds. The key, as you might have gathered, is the series of gaps. When light hits the device, the combination of those gaps and silicon sends different wavelengths left and right. You're not limited to specific light bands or directions, either; you can use an algorithm to design the link you need within a matter of minutes.

The technology is still young, but it's designed to be compatible with existing fiber optic networks and could theoretically improve transfers on high-capacity data lines (such as internet backbones) in ways that aren't possible with conventional optics. However, that's just the start. Stanford's dream is to develop photonic computer chips that replace "slow" electrical connections with much quicker, light-based pathways. You need more than just optical links to make that happen, but they're an important piece in the puzzle. You'll know who to thank if you eventually buy a photonic PC or phone that leaves your current hardware in the dust.

[Image credit: Vuckovic Lab]

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Source: Stanford, Nature

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Amazon launches a restaurant takeout and delivery service

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/04/amazon-local-takeout-delivery/

Amazon Local Takeout and Delivery

Amazon's already shown that it's intent on replacing your grocery store, with same-day deliveries and its Dash scanner, but now it wants to help at those times when you don't want to be in the kitchen. As part of its latest Amazon Local expansion, the internet retailer has launched a new Takeout & Delivery service, allowing customers to browse available local restaurants and order a freshly-cooked meal for pickup or have it delivered to their door. If you've used Grubhub or Seamless (before they merged) then you know the drill.

Currently, Amazon is trialling the service in Seattle. It offers dishes from over 100 local restaurants and will let you pay using the same Amazon account you use for your Prime deliveries. However, as we've seen in the past, the company doesn't like to limit services to one city for very long. With Amazon already listing tradespeople to help fix new TVs to the wall in homes in New York City and Seattle, it appears the company is intent on building out a physical presence locally -- without actually having to get its hands dirty.

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Via: Werner Vogels (Twitter)

Source: Amazon Local

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Square's new restaurant delivery app lets you track your meal

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/04/caviar-for-iphone/

Caviar for iPhone

Square's seemingly odd decision to buy a restaurant delivery service is starting to make sense. The company has just released Caviar's first mobile app for iOS, letting you order high-quality cooking from your iPhone in eligible cities like Chicago, New York and San Francisco. You've probably seen the basic concept of a delivery app before, but there's a clever twist here. This is more like Uber for haute cuisine; you can not only check the status of your order, but follow couriers as they bring your meal. In theory, you won't be caught off-guard when your food arrives.

There's no mention of apps for other platforms. However, it won't be surprising if those are coming soon. To Square, Caviar is a way to keep restaurants using its payment services whether or not you visit their dining rooms -- it's in the company's best interests to save you the trouble of booking a table when you'd rather stay in.

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Source: App Store

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Wednesday, December 03, 2014

Wire is a minimalist chat app backed by a Skype co-founder

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/03/wire-chat-app/

Skype co-founder Janus Friis thinks the 11-year-old program's a liiittle outdated, that's why he now backs and advises its newest rival called Wire. "A lot has changed since then -- we are all used to free calls and texting, and we have taken to carrying our computers in our pockets," he said. The app, according to the Germany- and Switzerland-based startup that created it, can take advantage of newer devices' (such as the iPhone 6's) large displays and capabilities. According to TechCrunch, it also boasts a number of under-the-hood improvements, including better file compression, even if it looks vastly simpler than Skype.

It has one of the most minimalist interfaces we've seen, in fact -- so much so, that we had a tough time getting used to the Mac client's controls and figuring out how to switch accounts. Navigating the mobile app felt more natural and entailed mostly swiping and pulling to access different screens. Nevertheless, either version allows you to upload your own pictures to use as background, as well as add friends straight from your contact list.

At the moment, Wire is capable of supporting pictures/GIFs/audio and other media in (one-on-one or group) text chats, making voice calls to and from WebRTC-compatible browsers (Chrome, Firefox and Opera), and even playing YouTube or SoundCloud files from within the chat window through embedded players. Unfortunately, it still can't replace your favorite chat app, as it can't make real-time video calls just yet. But the company promises to add that feature, among many others, in the future.

In addition to Friis himself, the startup is comprised of other employees who've once worked for major tech companies. CEO Jonathan Christensen was, himself, from Microsoft's MSN Messenger team, and many other employees came from the Skype team or corporations like Apple. If you want to give Wire a shot despite that Facebook Messenger, Line, Whatsapp, Hangouts, or any other messaging app on your phone, head over to its website for the download links. Since it's available for iOS, Android and Mac, it comes with the capability to sync messages across devices -- we just hope it doesn't usually crash as often as it did when we tried to register for an account.

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Via: Techcrunch, The Wall Street Journal

Source: Wire

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Tumblr adds a 'Buy' button for impulse shoppers

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/03/tumblr-buy-pledge-button/

People post other things on Tumblr besides GIFs and sob stories, you know -- some even use it to promote their handmade goods or crowdfunding projects. It's those users who'll benefit from this update the most, because the website now automatically adds Buy and Pledge buttons to users' posts, similar to the experimental Buy buttons on Twitter and Facebook. One merely has to post links that lead to the ever-familiar Etsy or Kickstarter, or to the more obscure Artsy (an online auction house) or DoSomething (home to campaigns that "make the world suck less"). And then, well, Tumblr will do the rest. We'll bet sellers would love being able to maximize their selling potential on Tumblr, especially now that holidays are approaching. So if you hate seeing those types of posts, you'll just have to find that other button labeled "unfollow."

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Source: Tumblr

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Samsung set to release its slimmest smartphone ever

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/03/samsung-galaxy-a7-leak/

Samsung is far from done releasing thin, all-metal, mid-range smartphones, judging by a leak at Chinese wireless regulator Tenaa. Though more modest in specs than the Galaxy Alpha, the new 5.5-inch Galaxy A7 is definitely the A-series' alpha model, trumping the Galaxy A5 and A3 phones. At 6.3mm, it's Samsung's slimmest model ever, and also sports a 1080p screen, 64-bit Snapdragon 615 CPU, 2GB of RAM, 16GB (non-upgradeable) memory and 13-megapixel front/5-megapixel rear cameras. The model shown above is strictly for the Chinese market -- to find out whether it'll come to these parts, you'll have to wait for Samsung's official word.

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Via: GSM Arena

Source: Tenaa

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Intel teams with Luxottica to make smart eyewear fashionable

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/03/intel-teams-with-luxottica/

Bvlgari glasses at a Luxottica event

In case it wasn't already clear that Intel believes wearable tech should be stylish, the company has just forged a multi-year partnership with the glasses gurus at the Luxottica Group. The two will collaborate on smart eyewear that you'd actually like to put on your face; it's not happy with the current, overly utilitarian (read: ugly) approach to heads-up displays. They aren't talking specifics, but the aim is to make "premium, luxury and sports" glasses with a dash of intelligence. You won't have to wait long to see the first fruits of this relationship, at least, since the duo expects a product in 2015. Between this and talk of Intel-powered Google Glass, it's clear that the chip maker wants a prominent spot on your cranium -- it's determined to take wearables seriously and avoid missing the boat, like it did with smartphones.

[Image credit: AP Photo/Gurinder Osan]

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Source: Intel

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Tuesday, December 02, 2014

drag2share: Google Drive now converts Office files inside Gmail

source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/02/google-drive-office-files-gmail/?utm_source=Feed_Classic_Full&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Engadget&?ncid=rss_full

Google sprinkled in the ability to edit Microsoft Office files in Drive a while back, but the folks in Mountain View are always looking to help improve that workflow. When a colleague sends a non-Google file as an attachment, you're now able to convert those to Drive-friendly files right inside Gmail. Need to send back the proper .docx? No worries. Installing a Chrome extension enables you to edit the file without making the switch. What's more, over a dozen more Office formats have been added to the productivity feature.

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Ultrasound Can Let You Touch and Feel 3D Shapes in Thin Air

Source: http://gizmodo.com/ultrasound-can-let-you-touch-and-feel-3d-shapes-in-thin-1665592066

Ultrasound Can Let You Touch and Feel 3D Shapes in Thin Air

Touch feedback has been advancing rapidly of recent time, and now we've gotten to the stage where ultrasound can be used to create entire 3D shapes to touch and feel in thin air.

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FBI warns businesses over malware that can override hard drive data

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/02/fbi-warns-businesses-over-malware-that-can-override-hard-drive-d/

hacking concept digital...

A number of American security professionals must have quickly switched from lazy Thanksgiving mode to high alert on Monday after receiving a flash warning from the FBI. A five-page document was sent out to US businesses' IT teams warning them against a highly destructive malware, which a group of hackers recently used to infiltrate several companies' computers, reports Reuters. In order for the companies to take preventative measures, the report contained the lowdown on the malware's technical details, such as its ability to override hard drives. The malicious code can apparently shut down and permanently disable computers, as well, making it impossible to retrieve files later on. The FBI issues "flash" warnings to businesses in order to update them about high-risk cyber threats. For this particular one, none of the malware's victims were named, and the agency also wouldn't confirm or deny when Reuters asked if Sony was one of them.

If you recall, Sony Pictures was on the receiving end of a big cyber attack in late November that took down all its computers and led to the leak of several unreleased movies, including Annie and Brad Pitt's Fury. Guardians of Peace (GOP), the group that launched the attack, threatened to unleash more internal data if their demands (which we still don't know the details of) weren't met. On Monday, we've received an email from someone who claims to be the GOP's leader, linking to a public pastebin that contains download links to what he says is part of the data they stole. Since the FBI wouldn't comment on Sony's situation, it's unclear if the company's still investigating what happened, and whether North Korea was truly involved in the incident.

[Image credit: Shutterstock / clarence s lewis]

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Source: Reuters

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Monday, December 01, 2014

drag2share: How to stop Yahoo from cashing in on your Flickr images

source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/01/yahoo-creative-commons-flickr-images/?utm_source=Feed_Classic_Full&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Engadget&?ncid=rss_full

If you post Flickr images with a commercial-use creative commons license, Yahoo has a little surprise: it will soon be free to sell them and keep all the money. It recently decided to peddle canvas prints of selected photos for up to $50, taking 100 percent of the revenue from creative commons users who permit free use of their images. That contrasts with a recent decision it made to give select users with non-commercial-use licenses 51 percent of sales for the same "Wall Art" collections. The new policy has made many of the site's devotees upset -- especially pro account users -- who say that while they're fine with third-party companies using their photos, they're not fine at all with Flickr itself selling them for profit.

Though Yahoo isn't breaking any laws, some feel it has broken the circle of trust with its large community of photographers. Flickr co-founder Stewart Butterfield told the WSJ that "it's hard to imagine the revenue from selling prints will cover the cost of lost goodwill." There is something that artists can do to stop Yahoo from using their work: switch the creative commons license to deny commercial use. Unfortunately, such a scorched-earth approach would also heavily reduce the supply of photos available to other businesses or non-profit groups.

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drag2share: Hackers are using finance smarts and English skills to attack biotech firms

source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/01/financial-hackers-fin4/?utm_source=Feed_Classic_Full&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Engadget&?ncid=rss_full

cyber crime hacker typing on laptop

Sometimes social engineering can be far more effective than complicated malware when it comes to cyber attacks. Case in point: the cybersecurity firm FireEye has tracked a recent spate of attacks against over 100 healthcare and pharmaceutical companies to a particularly smooth group of hackers. The group -- which FireEye calls "Fin4" -- leverages its knowledge of those industries, financial markets, and native English skills for targeted attacks against executives and other notable employees. Instead of relying on spyware, the group carefully crafts emails that trick recipients into logging into malicious websites to steal their email logins.

These aren't your typical hackers --- FireEye believes Fin4 is made up of Americans or Western Europeans who've worked in the U.S. banking industry. The sophisticated and methodical nature of the attacks also distinguishes them from the hackers who just want to blindly steal data.

Like something out of an airport espionage thriller, Fin4 appears to be gathering information about publicly traded companies in the hopes of getting a leg-up in the stock market. According to FireEye's VP of threat intelligence Dan McWhorter, this is the first time we're seeing such a sophisticated attack aimed at taking advantage of financial markets. But given just how effective it's been, we don't expect it to be the last.

[Photo: Benjamin Howell/Getty]

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Google isn't the only one making a modular smartphone

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/01/puzzlephone/

Circular Devices' Puzzlephone

It looks like Google's modular Project Ara smartphone has some fresh competition. Circular Devices has been working on the Puzzlephone, a simpler take on Android phones that you can upgrade yourself. Instead of letting you replace things piece-by-piece, it divides parts into "the Brain" (core electronics and camera), "the Heart" (battery and secondary tech) and "the Spine" (LCD, speakers and basic shape). It's not as flexible as Ara, but it promises a sleeker design that still includes real futureproofing; you can swap in a new module when you want a faster processor, a fresh battery or new features. The goal is to have a base phone that can last for 10 years, rather than two or three.

You won't have to wait too long to give the Puzzlephone a try... if everything goes according to plan. Circular Devices is near the prototype stage and hopes to have a shipping product in the second half of 2015, but a finished release is contingent on additional funding. It also faces an uphill battle when Project Ara has the full support of both Google and hardware partners. Still, it's good to know that that an alternative to Ara exists -- you hopefully won't have to settle for a single approach to modular mobile computing.

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Via: Gizmodo

Source: Puzzlephone

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This Investor Thinks Bitcoin Will Change EVERYTHING รข Not Just Finance

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-bitcoin-could-change-everything-not-just-finance-2014-12

bitcoin

Bitcoin will change a lot more than finance. It could also change how software is built and upend a bunch of today's biggest web companies, argues Joel Monegro of Union Square Ventures.

His argument starts with the block chain, the shared ledger where every Bitcoin transaction is recorded. Validating these transactions requires computing power. When each transaction is validated, a new block is added to the chain, which makes future transactions even harder to compute.

Bitcoin was designed this way to make sure that the same Bitcoin, which has no physical form, isn't spent twice by the same person. This also gives Bitcoin some inherent value — people or organizations have to spend a lot of money to run the computers that validate transactions, and the complexity of those computations is always increasing as the chain gets longer. 

But Monegro argues that these technical underpinnings of the Bitcoin system may have more long-term potential than the currency itself.

That's because the block chain is not controlled by any one person or entity, and information in it is freely available to other software programs. So programmers are starting to build things on top of the block chain that have nothing to do with digital currency. 

For instance, some programmers have developed a protocol called La'Zooz for real-time ride sharing. That could eventually disrupt Uber. Others have created OpenBazaar, a protocol for a a peer-to-peer trading network that could disrupt eBay. Both use the block chain for some basic computing tasks.

Here's a simple way of thinking about it. The block chain itself is immutable, like bedrock.  Bitcoin is like a building on top of that bedrock — it's got a fo! undation where programmers have defined some of the basics of how it works, then a bunch of stories on top of that where people interact with it.

But it's now possible for other folks to build their own buildings on top of the same bedrock.

"The block chain is great at two fundamental things," explains Monegro. "Distributed consensus, which is basically having a large network of computers agree on a value of something....that's a key component for any decentralized system. The other thing is time-stamping, holding a chronological order of things happening."

As new businesses crop up that depend on these functions, they'll benefit from turning to the Bitcoin block chain, rather than having to build a similar system from scratch.

This concept isn't new. Many tech companies have technology platforms that others can build on, from Microsoft to Google to Facebook. 

The Bitcoin block chain is different because everything underlying it is published, and there's no central controlling entity. The whole system works only because all the participants abide by the same set of rules, and any changes are dictated by hard math rather than a CEO or board of directors.

"Facebook wants to own and store the data that is relevant to their operation," says Monegro. "So does Google, so does everyone else. The data they store, they control it. The algorithms they run, they control it to serve their own purposes. A system like this, the protocols you build are open, not controlled by anybody. They work like a machine. They don't discriminate."

There's still reason to be skeptical. Bitcoin itself is still in a very early and tumultuous stage, as the collapse of the Mt. Gox exchange earlier this year showed. Speculation has caused some pretty wild price fluctuations — one Bitcoin is worth about $375 today, down fr! om a pea k of $1,242 in March 2013. That makes it an unreliable store of value, which could eventually drive people away.

Plus, the organizations building on top of the block chain tend to speak in utopian terms that could be a turn-off for outsiders. For instance, La'Zooz describes itself as "a completely decentralized and autonomous organisation. That means that anyone can contribute towards the establishment of its goals in whatever way he or she believes would be the best. Tasks are carried out within autonomous, self-defined circles or teams."

But that kind of utopian vision is how a lot of open-source projects started, and many of them have grown into essential technology. Take the Linux operating system, which runs most of the computers in the biggest data centers in the world, like your bank. Or Apache, which runs the majority of web servers. Or the protocols that formed the basis of the Internet itself.

Monegro and USV's Fred Wilson think that Bitcoin could become the same kind of foundational building block within the next 5 to 10 years.

Monegro's entire post is worth reading if you're interested in the technical vision. Here's a graphic showing the different layers of the platform he believes will built on the block chain, which he's going to detail in a set of follow-up posts:

blockchain app stack

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Sunday, November 30, 2014

drag2share: Graphene stronger than kevlar when blasted with Mach 9 microbullets

source: http://www.engadget.com/2014/11/28/graphene-stronger-than-kevlar-when-blasted-with-mach-9-microbull/?utm_source=Feed_Classic_Full&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Engadget&?ncid=rss_full

BRAZIL-WC2014-SECURITY-DRILL

Here's another new use for graphene (that will probably never happen): stopping bullets. University of Massachusetts-Amhers researchers have found that everybody's favorite potential wonder-material vastly outperforms steel and even kevlar armor. Testing the ultra-lightweight, 1-atom thick carbon sheets has proved tricky in the past, as they disintegrated on contact with regular bullets. So, the team used laser pulses to fire micron-sized glass bullets into the sheets at around 6,700 mph, about three times the speed of an M16 bullet (see below). Sheets from 30 to 300 layers thick absorbed the impacts much better than the other materials by deforming into a cone shape, then cracking.

But -- and there's always a but with graphene -- such sheets are currently too brittle to make into a solid material. The answer might be to stitch graphene flakes together, then vary the orientation to prevent cracking. Whatever, please just let us know us when you actually turn this material into a damn product.

[Image credit: AFP/Getty Images]

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